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Can we BYOD a Nexus 4 from Google Play?

Subject says it all.  Just wondering.  I'd like this instead of the older Gnex if possible.  I'm unable to find anything searching on it.

rory mcallister

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No--different physical technology.  The Nexus 4 from Google is a GSM phone, where it needs a SIM card from a provider to connect to the network.  Only AT&T and T-Mobile's networks use SIM cards in the U.S.  Ting runs on Sprint's network, which uses CDMA phones, so that model isn't compatible.  The full list of phones that can be brought over is here:

https://help.ting.com/entries/22567167-Bring-Your-Sprint-Device-to-Ting-A-List-of-All-Supported-Devices

Rocky Hinten
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Thanks Rocky!

Rory, since we operate on the Sprint network, we can only bring Sprint-branded phones to Ting. The link that Rocky posted is the definitive list of BYOD-able phones!

The only Nexus phones we can bring to Ting right now are the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and the Samsung Nexus S. Hope this helps!

Katie Lai
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If the nexus 4 doesn't work on your network, because it uses a sim card, then how can the nexus 5 use a sim card on your network and be ok. What am I missing? From what I read if I get a ting sim can shouldn't I be able to use my nexus 4 on your network?

William Gilbert
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The Nexus 4 does not have a CDMA radio. The Nexus 5 has a CDMA radio that is turned on when it sees a Sprint / Ting SIM.

Bruce Osborne
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Hi William.  As Bruce indicated, the Nexus 5 that can be used on Ting activates as a CDMA device and the SIM card is used only for LTE connection.  The Nexus 4 would not be accepted as an eligible device when you tried to add it to your Ting account as it is currently unsupported.

Marty M
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They can't.  As you'll see in the discussion above, the Nexus 4 does not have the right technology in it to work on Sprint's network, and as long as Ting is a reseller of Sprint, that's not going to be able to change.  The Nexus 4 is a great phone and a great price, but it is a GSM type of phone, so it can only work on AT&T or T-Mobile networks.  There are several other reseller providers that use those networks.

Rocky Hinten
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So if Sprint, and therefor Ting, cannot support GSM phones. Why does my Nexus 5 and my wife's iPhone 5 both need SIM cards? Isn't the SIM card for GSM only?

Johnny Freeman
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Hi Johnny!  SIM cards are not for GSM phones only.  Our network requires CDMA phones (or the Nexus 5 which has both CDMA and GSM technology), and the SIM card in the Sprint phones that require them is used to access LTE and other functions - it doesn't carry the phone's identity the same way it does in GSM phones.

Wendy K
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Johnny also many phones advertised as "world phones" are CDMA and also have GSM bands. Many times they are carrier locked and can be temporarily unlocked for travel. The Nexus 5 is a unique beast in that it can function full featured on all the major carriers in the US besides Verizon (not because of a limitation of the phone but Verizon are just jerks like that).

Wesley Stout
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I'll see if I can give an explanation that is simpler.  Let's pretend we're back in the old days, before there was any LTE data connection.  Back when there was just 3G, it was like this:  GSM phones contained the phone identification in the SIM card, not in the regular phone.  CDMA, instead, used the phones' serial numbers to identify them.  Two simple, separate worlds.

Now, LTE data networks apparently have to use a SIM card.  No problem for GSM--they already had that, so nothing changed.  For CDMA carriers, it was a little weird.  They were still using serial numbers for the voice and text ID, but they need a SIM for LTE data?  So the early LTE phones from Sprint basically seemed like the same Sprint thing--serial number--but they actually had a SIM built into the phone that you couldn't see or remove.  It's only some of the newer CDMA phones that are being made for more openness and transferability, so they let you put in different SIM cards for different networks, instead of having the SIM hardwired in.

Rocky Hinten