Is it possible to re-use the donor phone temporarily?

I am going camping for a week soon and would like to use my donor "feature" phone rather than my current "smart" phone that I brought over from Sprint and successfully hacked to use on Ting.  

why: the feature phone has better battery life, and I am less worried about it getting damaged. I really just want the phone for emergency use (both outbound and incoming emergencies).

Would it be bad to:

 - turn off my smart phone, put it away

 - wait a few minutes, turn on my feature phone

  • use my feature phone for  week

  • when I get back home, turn off the feature phone, and put it away

  • wait a few minutes, turn back on my smart phone

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Comments

13 comments
  • That's no problem... I do it sometimes myself. Just make sure that you don't have both devices turned on at the same time.

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  • Yep that will be no problem. I do the same thing I use my donor phone when ever I am doing something that could damage my phone.

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  • Don't just turn off the smartphone, remove its battery. :) You'll be good to go.

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  • What is the expected behavior if the two phones are simultaneously powered on?

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  • It's rumored that there is a fraud detection system in place so that if 2 devices are connected using the same ESN/MEID, your account may be flagged. This is a concern because the legality of cloning phones is questionable.

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  • Is it a violation of Ting's terms of service to have more than one device with the same ESN/MEID powered on concurrently?

    What, if any, law prohibits configuration of one phone to use an ESN/MEID that was previously assigned to another?

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  • The only information I can find about the legality of it is here: http://www.fcc.gov/guides/cell-phone-fraud/ and that seems to be limited to "unauthorized" cloning, which in my understanding does not mean cloning that a user does themselves. I do suspect that the fraud detection on the Sprint network might be a concern, as it is designed to protect the user (favoring discontinuing service over allowing a suspicious duplicate phone to access services).

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  • I'm not sure about Ting's terms, but the Wireless Telephone Protection Act of 1998 prohibits "knowingly using, producing, trafficking in, having control or custody of, or possessing hardware or software knowing that it has been configured to insert or modify telecommunication identifying information associated with or contained in a telecommunications instrument so that such instrument may be used to obtain telecommunications service without authorization." The debate comes down to the finer details of the law. Some say simply cloning the phone is enough to get you in trouble while others say it must be proven that you intended to defraud. The main thing is that turning both phones on will get you noticed and then you may end up in a situation where you have to hire a lawyer to figure out those finer details for you. Your best bet is to avoid the unnecessary attention from the feds.

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  • "without authorization" is the key in the statement you quoted. You as the customer can authorize your own device to be clone (and consent is implied if you do the clone yourself), and as for the service provider, Ting has openly encourages "hacking" to make devices work on the network and has stated having no interest in what happens to the phones once they are purchased.

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  • Ting policy has been written all over that they support cloning but its the users responsibility to figure it out. However using both phones at once can trigger Sprints scanners to block the IMEI from their network. In my opinion using a clone phone should be legal and is because the provider is allowing it and you are paying for the service. You are not trying to use someone else service nor to hack into the network. I don't know about you but if people start abusing the system and trying to use both phones at once eventually they (Sprint, Verizon, AT&t, etc) will make it harder for us to clone phones.  Lets keep it safe for everyone and only use one phone at a time.

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  • Jose wrote, "Ting policy has been written all over that they support cloning but its the users responsibility to figure it out."  Could someone please link to the source of that information?  Doing so will allow anyone who comes upon this thread to find an authoritative answer.

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  • I like this quote from the "can-i-bring-my-existing-device-to-ting" thread:

    ...Chad: It's an interesting idea although there's just too much involved. We're happy to promote hacking a device to those who are capable and willing to invest the time and effort. That's quite a bit different from ACTUALLY doing it ourselves and then having to support it after the fact...

    (from April 20, 2012 13:07)

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