Rooting the Galaxy S3

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1743780

This did the trick. Good instructions for rooting your S3.

 

If you don't know what rooting is... DON'T do it. Read up first, see if you want to... remember you can brick your phone... watch the video 5x.... think about it some more... well, you get the idea.

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  • Thanks :) I'll be giving it a shot at some point.

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  • Don't forget to create a restore image if you also put on cyanogenmod (or any other rom).  I wound up using mine. cyanogenmod doesn't support exFat, and Fat32 doesn't support files larger than 4GB. I bought a 64GB card for movies, so I just switched back.

    It was running smoothly while I had it on.

    Rooting is nice, if for nothing else, installing Titanium backup, and Root Explorer.

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  • That's my plan too: stock + root. Thanks for the info round-up. My shiny new Galaxy SIII from Ting arrives Friday and I'll be needing this info on Saturday.

    Does rooting result in a reset on the phone? In other words, if you're going to root then do it before you spend a lot of time setting up your phone?

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  • You're good, John. Rooting won't mess anything up... putting on a new rom, well yeah, but that's one of the reasons I use Titanium backup. It puts all my app/settings right to where I had them on the last backup.

    Another reason to use titanium, you can get rid of the crapware. Although you don't want to remove something you might need, so titanium lets you "freeze" apps. Something you can do manually, but much easier through titanium.

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  • I'm wondering if OTA updates work as normal after rooting. Do you lose root after an OTA update?

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  • OTA updates for phones often include patches that not only make you lose root, but also patch the hole that allowed you to get root in the first place. You should avoid OTA updates on a rooted phone in general.

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  • Aaron, I don't think that is the case with Sprint. Also, the community always figures out a hack around it. Yeah, it does kill your root, but may improve your phone. I do the upgrades, then reroot when possible. YMMV

    Most of the time though, I'm on a different rom, so I don't see the updates. I have to re-stock my phone (sometimes I don't bother, the roms eventually get the new kernals/radios), then redo everything.

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  • I also used this root method for the S3. Worked great. Can't say the same for the CM10 9/21 nightly, though.

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  • Same here, the CM10 nightly was pretty good for me other than the fact that my mobile data didn't work at all with under it. Restored back to Touchwiz until I figure out what was wrong.

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  • download a root restore utility from the market to restore root after OTA.

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  • I'm running the 9/24 nightly CM10 on my S3 and it is working excellently. 

    I used this tool for rooting:  http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1746680

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  • Do you have LTE and does it work for you? I think that is what wasn't working for me, I could get 3G data but not LTE.

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  • LTE isn't available here so I can't comment on that.

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  • Anyone here have a suggestion for rooting with Mac? I'm one of those odd people that like MacOS but don't like iOS -- enter Android!  :)  I want to root simply to remove the annoying camera shutter sound...no real interest in flashing ROMs at this point...maybe after the phone is older...so I don't want to have to spend a lot of time and effort (such as installing a Windows partition) to do this if I don't have to. 

    Thanks!

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  • Thanks for the link, David!  However, it doesn't seem to be the right model.  I didn't think I could use the same rooting procedure for the international version as for the U.S. version.  Did I miss something on the page?  I've only rooted one phone and even then, I was holding my breath while doing so...I'm not an expert, so maybe I have misunderstood what I have read. :)

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  • Hi. I've seen two different guides for rooting the Galaxy S3 from a Mac. The computer I use most often at home is a Mac. After reading the Mac instructions and some of the complaints in the comment threads, I decided that it would be worth rooting from a Windows PC to avoid potential trouble. I followed the link at the top of this thread. The YouTube video on that page was extremely helpful and makes the whole process virtually painless if you follow along. So, just my opinion, but if you have access to a Windows PC it might be a more foolproof method at this point.

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  • Erica, apologies, should've caught that. I'm primarily a Mac user, but used the Windows method to root my S3. Heimdall (https://github.com/downloads/Benjamin-Dobell/Heimdall/heimdall-suite-1.3.2-mac.dmg) is an open source, cross platform (Mac OS X compatible) alternative to Odin (the Windows program used to root the GS3). I have not tried Heimdall on the Sprint GS3 (or seen any evidence of others using it), but in theory, you should be able to follow the directions linked at the top of this thread (http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1743780) and just use Heimdall instead of Odin. Of course, the standard disclaimers about rooting/bricking/zombie apocalypse apply.

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  • Thanks for the help again (both to John and David)!  I'll google around about Heimdall...I'm not sure I'm brave enough to mess with my new phone on a theory ;)  but maybe I can find some information out there that will bolster my courage.   The only Windows computer I have access to is a work machine and generally, putting that kind of stuff on it is frowned upon.  I REALLY am not a Windows fan and don't want to clutter my home system with the extra stuff, but it looks like I might have to.  

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  • For anyone else who might be interested and who is maybe a bit of a NOOB like me...I ended up installing VirtualBox on my Mac (a 2009 iMac running OSX Lion) and running the free Windows 8 preview  in a VM (32 bit -- I had trouble with the 64 bit version).  The above rooting method worked fine even though it uses Win7 as the example.

    I had never dinked around with VirtualBox before, so the hardest part was making the virtual machine see my USB ports.  When in download mode, the system doesn't see it as the SPH-L710.  Instead, it's reported as a MSM8960 with "Sasmsung" as the manufacturer, misspelling intentional. (So, my USB filter on "Samsung" didn't work on the VM.)  Go figure! :)

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  • Realistically speaking, what are the practical consequences to rooting a Ting phone? What will I lose with regards to support if I have a problem with my phone later?

    I ask because while I am fairly technically inclined and am fairly confident I can complete the root process successfully, I am on fixed income, and had to carefully budget for some time to be able to afford a high end phone I could reasonably believe would last me Quite Some Time. If something goes wrong with the phone in the next couple years and I /can't/ get it serviced, I'm unlikely to be able to pay for a replacement.

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  • @Erica, glad you got it working and thanks for the tips on using VirtualBox.

    @Amy, the only consequence that you should experience is voiding the warranty on your phone. If you ever experience problems with your phone, but it functions enough to unroot it and restore it to stock (there are guides for this), you shouldn't have any problems getting it repaired/replaced under warranty. However, a fully "bricked" phone will not be able to be restored to stock, and will not be covered by the warranty. Rooting does carry a risk of bricking your phone, but this is rare, especially if you follow a how-to guide that has been used by many others and posted from an established member of the Android community. The link at the top of this thread is a good one.

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  • I suppose the scenario I'm worried about is if something happens down the road that causes the phone to be in a state where I can no longer restore it to stock, but it would otherwise be a covered problem.

    I'll have to think on it more. Today I lost several opportunities to take photographs of animals outside because the initial shutter sound spooked them... and with photography, the trick to the art is taking several photos in rapid succession. Hard to do if your subject bails out. This is a pretty strong impetus to getting the ability to fix a critical problem. I'm just afraid of losing out on the investment later because of it.

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  • For what it's worth, you could root the phone, silence the shutter by renaming the shutter sound files, un-root, and then call it a day. You be on a completely stock phone with the exception of the shutter tweak.

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  • I had previously been under the impression from the instructions I've read for "un-rooting" the S3 that it involves flashing it back to its original state.

    With your suggesting this possibility, I read the instructions linked from the page linked in the OP: http://www.epiccm.org/2012/06/sprint-sgs3-stock-restore.html

    "This method does not completely restore "Normal" status if you have applied other custom mods or further modified your System directory beyond basic rooting."

    The shutter sound files are in /system/media, are they not

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  • Correct, /system/media.

    That link is referring to Samsung's reporting whether the phone is in a "Normal" or "Modified" state. As I understand it, this is what determines if the phone is out of warranty. Those instructions are only removing root and restoring the stock boot and recovery to your device. So if you deleted or renamed the camera sounds, this unroot method wouldn't interfere with your edits. However, I'm not sure that the phone would report itself as "Normal" if you delete or rename system files.

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  • I found it really hard to find online, but the warranty on the GS3 appears to be only 90 days. So maybe just wait til your warranty is up before rooting?

    My main desire for rooting is to limit permissions of apps. For example, I found that Bad Piggies game used 8 MB of mobile data today and I think I may have played it for less than an hour today. Unacceptable.
    I want a firewall app and they all seem to need rooted phone. So I am very thankful for the link provided. I will be rooting phone shortly. And using airplane mode to play Piggies from now on. ;-)

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  • Hi everybody.

    I just got a samsung gs3 on sprint.

    I'm a mac user, running 10.5 on a macbook.

    I have never had an android phone. Where should I start to learn about my phone and what it can do?

     Should I root it? Is there any downside or risk to rooting? Mind you, I’m not a super technical fellow & have only owned Macs for my entire life. Can I successfully root with a mac? A lot of questions.

     Would uber appreciate any advice:)

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  • It's possible to root from a Mac, but it is much easier and better supported from a Windows PC. On the whole, it will probably be less hassle for you to find a way to do it via a Windows PC (Bootcamp, VMWare, Parallels, family or friend with Windows PC) than jumping through the hoops on a Mac. This is from personal experience.

    The walk-though videos posted on YouTube by QBKing77 are an excellent way to get started. He even does reviews of some of the more popular 3rd party roms.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7011CD883D5201B8&feature=plcp

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