Using Google Voice on your Ting phone

I'd like to share my solution for successfully using Google Voice on my Ting phone. For reference, I opted for a new phone number from Ting (i.e., I did not port).

First, configure GVoice as you would for any other phone. GVoice should recognize your handset as a Sprint handset. If you plan on using Google Voice's voicemail as your primary voicemail system, configure that, too. Be aware: the on-screen prompts from Google may provide inaccurate information for initiating call forwarding (on which GVoice relies when activating voicemail for you). See your handset's manual for instructions on properly configuring call forwarding.

This is the most important step: In your Ting Dashboard, load the Settings page for your handset. Uncheck "Call Forwarding can be set on phone." Instead, check "Forward 'No Answer' calls to this number," and type your GVoice number in the corresponding field. This will ensure that GVoice properly "hands off" calls placed to it.

Note that this method has been verified by Ting customer support. Many thanks to Brian for his help and patience.

 

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Using Google Voice on Ting FAQ [Updated November 1, 2013]

Preface

Google recently announced sweeping changes to its Google Voice service—changes that could render the contents of this thread inaccurate. See this link (https://plus.google.com/106636280351174936240/posts/MjyncJEbzxK) for additional detail regarding these potential changes, the implementation of which could occur as early as May 2014.

What is Google Voice?

Google Voice (abbreviated "GVoice" or "GV" in this thread) is a service from Google that provides users with a way to "unite" their many telephone numbers. Google Voice users receive a new telephone number and can "link" their existing phone numbers to this new one. When dialed, the new number effectively "rings" all other telephones linked to it. For example, one might link both a home phone and an office phone to a Google Voice number which, when dialed, will cause both the home phone and office phone to ring. Google Voice also offers additional functionality—such as voicemail archiving and transcription, customized voicemail greetings, "do not disturb" protocols, and spam blocking—that users in this thread find useful. For more information, visit http://voice.google.com.

Does Google Voice allow me to make telephone calls over the Internet?

No. Google Voice is not a Voice over Internet Protocol service (or application). Some Ting customers pair Google Voice with GrooveIP to acquire Voice over Internet Protocol functionality.

So why does the Google Voice application ask me to "use Google Voice to make all calls." Isn't it making my telephone calls over the Internet?

No. By making telephone calls "through" Google Voice, you are asking Google Voice to display your Google Voice number as your caller ID information, so that others will see your Google Voice number on their handsets when you call them (and not the caller ID information of, say, the mobile phone or office phone you have linked to Google Voice). You are not making VoIP calls. Using Google Voice to make telephone calls will require you to pay for minutes with Ting. To make VoIP telephone calls, use an application like GrooveIP (see below).

Am I using my Ting minutes when I place calls with Google Voice?

**Yes
.** Google Voice is not an application for making free telephone calls.

What does Google Voice cost?

Nothing. Google offers Google Voice for free. Of course, as is the case with any of Google's "free" services, the company uses data collected from Google Voice users to produce and distribute targeted advertising.

I see that Google and Sprint have partnered to allow Sprint customers to deeply integrate Google Voice with their mobile phones. Can I do this?

No. This special integration is available only to Sprint customers, not Ting customers.

Can I send text messages with Google Voice?

Yes. Google Voice features free text messaging to mobile phones in the United States or Canada. By downloading Google's Google Voice application to their Ting handsets, users are able to send and receive text messages without incurring text messaging charges from Ting, drastically reducing their messaging bills. To do this, you must use the Google Voice application and not Android's built-in Messages application. However, Ting users are reporting that sending text messages via the Google Voice application does in fact require a tiny amount of data, though the amount is almost negligible (and using the application over a wifi connection does not incur data charges). Read the thread for these reports.

People are calling my Google Voice number, but my Ting phone isn't ringing. What should I do?

First, be sure your Ting number is properly "linked" to your Google Voice account. You should modify your Google Voice settings to include your Ting telephone number in the list of numbers GV will ring when someone calls your GV number. In your Google Voice dashboard, click "Settings > Phones" to ensure your configurtion is correct. Next, check your Ting dashboard to ensure that the "Call Forwarding can be set on phone" option is unchecked. Instead, check "Forward 'No Answer' calls to this number," and type your GV number in the corresponding field. You should now receive calls placed to your GV number.

What is GrooveIP?

GrooveIP is Android software from snrb Labs that allows users to make telephone calls using their wireless Internet connections rather their cellular connections (something typically called "Voice over Internet Protocol," or "VoIP"). To do this, GrooveIP utilizes Google Voice, so anyone wishing to use GrooveIP must also have a Google Voice account. But using Google Voice does not necessitate the use of GrooveIP. Put another way: While one must use Google Voice in order to to GrooveIP, one needn't use GrooveIP in order to use Google Voice.

So why are you discussing GrooveIP here in a thread about Google Voice?

Many Ting users have found clever ways to use Google Voice and GrooveIP in tandem in order to significantly reduce their monthly Ting bills. Read the thread for more on how this can be done.

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Comments

404 comments
  • Great to hear your working out now!

    You should check out an app on the market called DataSaver :)  Basically does exactly what you are talking about for a database of hotspots.

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  • Thanks for this awesome forum.  I apologize for the length of this post in advance.  I discovered Ting a couple of weeks ago, and, considering I have resisted a smart phone all these years because I hate the way the wireless companies rip-off customers, of course it caught my attention.

    I guess I’ll start with what my goals are, and then how I think I would get there.  Hopefully someone with knowledge can steer me the right way.

    Goals:

    1)             Reduce phone bill (compared to Verizon)—in other words, use Google Voice and VoIP as much as possible to handle text and voice.

    2)             Reasonable data costs.  I won’t use a lot of data because I spend most of my time in a hospital (with great WiFi network and poor cell service) or at home (which also has a great WiFi network and poor cell service).  I expect the amount of data monthly will be small.

    3)             Seamless integration:  It would be great if my phone realized it was in a WiFi network and automatically switched to WiFi instead of the cell towers for voice and data.

    4)             Integration with Home phone:  I have an Ooma, so my home phone is essentially free, too (I don’t even pay the taxes since I predated that rule).  If my phone could realize I was home, and then route incoming calls to my home phone, I would save cell minutes and have better service, too.

    How I see accomplishing this:

    1)             I get a Ting device with its own phone number. Nobody needs to know this number.  I port my Verizon cell number to Google Voice—I am well beyond contract date so no termination fees.

    2)             Install Google Voice App, Groove IP or Talkatone, and AutoAP.  The settings are pretty well described in this forum that would allow my phone to integrate with Google voice to use VoIP for calls and route texts through Google.  There is a minimal data cost for texts, but this is small, from what I understand.  MMS is not supported at this time.

    3)             Here is where I am a bit confused:   I’ve seen the app named “Tasker”, which, when combined with “Locale GV Settings” can essentially recognize that my cell phone is at home and tell Google Voice to route any calls to the Google Voice number to my home phone.  This seems too good to be true, and too easy!  Am I missing something? 

    Obviously, calls OUT from my home phone will show my home number as caller ID, but that is fine.  With what I have detailed above, it appears that I can get myself a nice Android phone, activate it on Ting (its own number), port the number everybody already knows for me from Verizon to Google voice, and arrange that when that number is called when I am at home, it rings my home number for me. 

    So, it appears to me I can finally get into the modern age, limit my fees, and have the phone tightly integrate with my home phone.  Furthermore, I may even be able to finally get rid of my pager in the hospital and just have people call my phone—never possible in the past due to poor cell service, but with WiFi integration, very possible.

    Thoughts?

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  • David K - Do you know what version of Android the phone you will be getting has?  If it has Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean) then the AutoAP app will be worthless.  Google in their infinite wisdom decided to quit allowing apps to turn airplane mode on and off.  The setup in this thread works by leaving GV to forward calls to both your Ting number and Google Chat.  Normally this would cause the phone to double ring when a call came in, but  AutoAP would prevent this by switching into airplane mode when wifi was detected and out of airplane mode when wifi was lost (when in airplane mode, the forward to the Ting number would fail, when wifi is not present the google chat forward would fail.)  

    The makers of GrooveIP make an app called GrooveForwarder that is supposed to help with the double ring, but I couldn't get it work even with a number of emails to tech support.  I am new to tasker and have been looking at the Locale GV Settings plugin you mention.  It seems it should work. 

    One complaint I had about AutoAP is that it would connect to WIFI and switch into airplane mode even if the wifi signal was weak to the point of being worthless.  I am seeing if there's a way for tasker to use the info in the variable %WIFII to keep tabs on wifi strength and switch back to cell if its too weak to be useful.

    How do you like the Ooma?  My wife is a stay at home mom--we tried using GrooVeIP on her phone but she always reported echos or the other person cutting out.  I'm curious if the Ooma resolves those problems by being hard wired into the network instead of using WIFI for VOIP.  

    Thanks

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  • Jason, I have to admit I am totally ignorant of Android phones as I have never personally had a smart phone.  However, I was thinking about a Samsung Galaxy S3 since I can get a used one for a reasonable price, and it seems like that uses "Ice Cream Sandwich" (4.0).  So I guess that would be a non-issue with AutoAP?  

    Since most of the places I hang out have strong WiFi signals (home, hospital) I am hopeful the AutoAP issue with regard to weak signals won't be a problem.  

    I have had my Ooma for 4.5 years.  The only time we have ever had problems with it had to do with internet problems at our house (i.e. if Comcast is down, Ooma obviously is down).  But otherwise, it is just like a regular house phone, but with more features (and fewer bills!).  I guess I also had another issue the past week, when my Scout went down (I have the original "Hub and Scout", not the Telo).  I bought another on eBay for $35 and had my second line back up in no time.  I give the Ooma two thumbs up.

    I have also considered a Nexus S or Galaxy Nexus, both of which seem to run 4.1, but the S3 seems to get better reviews overall and can take an SD card.  I don't know if that is important but I just think it can't hurt.  Do you have a preference for one over the other for what I am trying to accomplish, or even another phone?  I really don't need a tremendous amount of power, but since one of the downsides of Ting is paying for a non-subsidized phone, I feel I should get one with "staying power".

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  • I have the Galaxy Nexus and like it for the most part.  I got it on ebay for $190 - the only catch for buying on ebay is that it must be the Sprint version, can't require a contract and must have a clean ESN.  Most listings state whether or not the ESN is clean so be sure to check if you go that route.  I don't think I would really consider the Nexus S since it's a fairly old phone (older than the Galaxy Nexus).  I don't have any experience with the S3 I guess the big difference is the user interface - the Galaxy Nexus is older and running stock android (nice if you like to customize everything) and the S3 is newer and has Samsung's overlay (TouchWiz) on it.  The S3 is also likely to have a lot of Sprint bloatware.  I guess it depends on whether you're a tinkerer or not.  If you do like to tinker with stuff and go with the S3 you might try a custom version of android called Cyanogenmod, although installing it isn't for the faint of heart.

    AutoAP should work great with Ice Cream Sandwich.  I went ahead and bought the Locale GV Settings plugin for tasker yesterday and created a profile that when connected to wifi, checks it's strength.  If the strength is good enough for long enough (about a min) then it switches to use only the google chat forward.  If the wifi is bad enough for long enough, then it switches back to only forward to my ting number.  The only downside is that in order to make the switch, data is required.  If data isn't  available because cell/wifi signal is too weak then the switch back won't be made. I'm testing it now to see how big a deal it is.  If it works, I'll post the tasker profile here.

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  • I don't use Ooma, but I use the OBI100 device, and that works great for free calls at home.  I have it successfully set up where Tasker switches on airplane mode when I'm on home wifi, so all calls just go through the OBI.  When I disconnect, it enables the radio again.   The Locale GV Settings plugin seems to work pretty well at telling where to route the calls, although you can always just have it send to both (unless someone at home is going to be annoyed if it rings and you're not there).  It has been working well for me since October.

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  • Matt, I'm glad to see you commented on this, because in reviewing this thread (all three pages...) again, one of your earlier posts garnered some interest.  I noticed that you are doing basically exactly what I am trying to do, only with the Obi (rather than an Ooma)--the difference being that the Obi, as best as I can tell, uses Google Voice itself. (Ooma is just basically its own provider).

    I received my phone yesterday (used Galaxy S2), and have started the cumbersome job of learning how to use Tasker. (I noticed you mentioned you have some experience with Tasker).  I set up a profile to recognize when I am connected to my home network, and set up Locale GV Settings to "Google Talk off", "Ting off", and "Home on".  The profile is currently green, so I assume it is active.  If I call my Google voice number, my home phone rings--great, it works...or does it?

    Problem is, on the Google Voice web settings page (accessed with my computer's browser) has in its settings to forward calls to Home, too.  So, I did not know whether the calls were being forwarded to home because my Locale GV Settings said to, or because I had Google voice set up that way on the web.  So, I changed my Locale GV settings on the Tasker profile to send calls to my Google Voice number to my Ting phone instead of home.  When I called my Google voice number--my home phone rang.  Ugh!

    So, I guess I am confused about the role that Tasker/Locale GV Settings will play since the Google Voice Settings page (on the web) also routes calls.  Since I want the process to be dynamic (that's the point of Tasker/Locale GV Settings for this) dependent on, in my case, location, how do I overcome the web settings, which, unless I manually change them, are static?

    Unfortunately, having both home and my cell ring when someone calls my GV number is not practical.  Since I am at work and my wife at home, the phone ringing at home will not only disturb her, but also mean I won't get calls if she answers before me.

    Overall, this is a fabulous forum for a newbie like myself to work through these many issues.  Keep up the good work!

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  • David,

    I think I understand what you're working on and I'll try to explain.  The Locale GV Settings plugin will work with Tasker and it actually changes the settings on the GV settings page.  You can check this by checking the settings page after a Tasker condition in your profile changes and the setting will also change.  So I have a Tasker profile that recognizes when I am on my home WiFi, and it uses the Locale GV Settings plugin to route calls to the OBI device (or through gmail or chat, same thing).  When I disconnect from home WiFi, it uses the plugin to again switch the GV settings so that calls are routed just to the cell phone.  Does that make sense.  If you need any help creating the profile for Tasker, let me know.

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  • Since you brought this up, I was checking on my phone and it isn't working anymore (the plugin).  It was having some problems recently and I had just set it to ring to phone and OBI, and I didn't have time to mess with it.  Now when I use the profile, it doesn't work.  I'll past the profile below for you since I have it right here.  Let me know if you get it working.  I sent an email to developer.

     

    Profile: Phone Select (14)

    State: Wifi Connected [ SSID: MyhomewifiSSID MAC:* IP:* ]

    Enter: Home Phone On (16)

    A1: Airplane Mode [ Set:On ] 

    A2: GV Settings [ Configuration:Goog:on; Ting:off;  Package:com.steelgirder.LocaleGVSettingsPlugin Name:GV Settings ] 

    A3: Auto-Sync [ Set:On ]

    Exit: Cell Phone On (18)

    A1: Airplane Mode [ Set:Off ] 

    A2: GV Settings [ Configuration:Goog:off; Ting:on;  Package:com.steelgirder.LocaleGVSettingsPlugin Name:GV Settings ] 

    A3: Auto-Sync [ Set:Off ] 

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  • I think we are talking the same thing.  I have a Tasker profile set up to recognize when I am home.  Seems to work pretty well--the profile is Green when I am home, and I just went to a friend's house and it was not longer green.  So that seems to be working fine.

    A task I have assigned to that profile is to modify the Locale GV Settings plugin. Looking at yours (and I don't know yet how to export the configuration file, so all I can do is describe it).  My GV settings would ideally read Goog: off, Ting: off, and Home:on, the difference being that my Ooma is my home number (where your Obi is your Google number).  But since Google Voice offers the option to put in my home number, this should work fine...and it does, except for it works only because my home phone is ALWAYS ringing.  In other words, when I change it to Goog: off, Ting: on, Home: off, then a call to my Google number should ring my Ting phone.  However, when I do this, my home phone still rings.

    If I can get this to work, it will make the integration very smooth.  Just give everyone my Google Voice number (which will end up being my current, soon to be defunct VZW number when I port it), and the phone will route calls to home (if I am there) or to Ting (if I am not).

    Based upon your post, it seems like this might not be a user error on my part, since you seem to be experiencing a similar problem.  I'm not sure if that is a good thing or a bad thing.  Let me know if you get it figured out.

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  • Interesting thread...  I am thinking about doing something similar like David, although using a regular landline.  (although OBI & Ooma sound like an improvement over GrooveIP  perhaps)  I'm not so concerned about my minutes since I have unlimited long distance with my landline. (and so far, can't bring myself to sever the copper line) But I could save Ting minutes by using GV & my home phone.

    I set up GV and it works fine as far as ringing both phones like David said.  And like David, I would like my home phone not to ring if I'm not there. It sounds like Tasker may do this.

    My problem is not being able to identify an incoming call to my home number via GV vs a regular call.  I would like to know if it's a customer, so I could answer the phone, saying the company name, to be more professional.  Since the caller ID doesn't show the call as from GV (I don't think) I don't know if it was forwarded through GV or not.  I don't believe I saw any options on GV to accomplish this.  Has anyone else come across this issue and found a solution?

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  • Mike:

    One trick you can use to identify a call that is going through your Google voice account is to show your caller ID (Incoming) to show your Google number.

     

     

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  • Robin, thanks, I missed that.  OK David & Matt get the bugs out, so I can try it  :)  I may play with it myself.  Thanks to all.

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  • I tried the same profile on a Galaxy SIII today and it worked fine.  Doesn't work on the LG Marquee.  So that means it is likely an OS problem?  I haven't heard back from the developer yet.

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  • Well, I've had mixed success.  I set up my Tasker profile as Matt suggested, but often find that it will not automatically make the change to my Google Voice direction of calls despite the fact that the profile is clearly active.  When I get home, I have found that turning my phone off/on when at home will usually do the trick--calls will then get re-routed to my home phone correctly.  Not ideal, but it seems to work.  Same thing when leaving--I was an hour away from my house yesterday and called my GV number.  This should make my cell ring, but did not.  Turned my phone off/on, and redialed GV.  Call was routed to my cell correctly.

    So, it seems like my Tasker profile is working--sort of--but not as automatically as I would hope, especially since it clearly is "green" when I get home, meaning the profile is active, but the action has not actually occurred without rebooting.

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  • I need help! I intended to use GrooveIP and my home wifi to save even more money if my wife wants to talk for hours with the kids. But I have not been able to get it to work reliably enough to drop the land line. I've done all the suggestions in the thread (I have had several settings mistakes corrected thanks to this thread! Thanks!) but still only works occasionally. Usually, my wife's phone does not ring, caller gets the voice-mail recording, and sometime later she will get a notification that she may not look at for hours, and too late realizes that the notification was for a missed call, not an update. Any clues if this is a GV problem or a GrooveIP problem?

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  • Unsure, I gave up on GrooveIP and use VIOP in Gmail on my laptop to when I'm at home and it works GREAT. 

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  • I've also abandoned GrooveIP (and its alternatives) due to poor performance in recent months. Callers consistently complained about shoddy connections full of hissing and crackle.

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  • william b: Tell us more about VOIP with gmail. How do you connect thru gmail?

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  • Sure, get a gmail account, you may need to switch back to the old version of gmail layout for simplicity, then get a google voice phone number, at the home screen of gmail on the lower left hand side there is a phone icon, click it, it will ask you to download the plugin software, and you can send and receive VIOP calls on your laptop very reliably. I also use a hands free bluetooth for longer calls. 

    This is all done on wifi on my laptop which I leave on and plugged in, I both have our gmail tab open on the browser with the laptop open. Our laptop will ring first, then our phone will begin ringing, so we just answer the call on our laptop.  As you can tell I'm ALL in with google services, as I use google voice number only and linked my ting number with my google number, and only have my ting account settings to send/receive calls, and access internet.You're probably wondering if google can do VOIP well on wifi from a computer how come they can't do it on the phone!? :)  Because there refusing and politics bla bla bla. And grooveip, well it's just NOT reliable. 

    The company bandwith.com which owns republic wireless, supports google's VOIP service, so I get great free service that works, while other RW customers are paying $20 a month for beta service. And I chose not to use the obi100 as I think it's easier to do it everything on the computer. Someday I think google will sell cell service and wrap ALL their services on the cellphone. Hopes this all helps.......

     

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  • I also abandoned Groove IP a long time ago- too inconsistent on call quality.  Got the Obi100 and have used it since with zero problems.  Works great and integrates perfectly with phone.  I've recommended it to family and friends as well and they love it.  Stop wasting your time and get one.

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  • I just got on Ting, am using a Samsung Transform Ultra ($68 from Cellular Country), and using Talkatone and Google Voice that is a sweet combo. When on WiFi, which is most always if I want since I have a mobile MiFi through Sprint from work, I can use no minutes for anyone who calls me via Google Voice. Some still use Ting/Cell number which is fine and minimal. I am wondering why the advice from Feb '12 Using Google Voice on Your Ting Phone says to check 'forward unanswered calls to this number' and to put in your GV number. Won't this just add minute charges for the forward and same if you add to busy calls as well, even if only going to voice mail. If you don't check that, the call would go to Ting voicemail with no minute charge, correct? Only advantage is that calls to your Ting number could forward to other GV linked numbers, but if not answering Ting number, I am probably not answering others. Seems many would prefer, like me, to not do so. Any thoughts or advice here, like am I missing something.

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  • @Rick

    Activating call forwarding in the way you describe (and the way I describe in the initial FAQ) is the only way I could effectively configure Google Voice to work with my Ting phone. Without forwarding, calls to Google Voice did not ring my Ting handset. Perhaps something has changed (you're welcome to confirm this), but if it hasn't, then activating call forwarding is the only way to link Google Voice and Ting.

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  • Overall, I have this working pretty well, at least enough so that I have abandoned my Verizon phone and ported the number to Google Voice.  Set it up just like described early in this thread.  I was having trouble using Tasker to turn on/off my various radios--I find that AutoAP works a lot better for me to control the radios, but I understand that later Android OS may not allow AutoAP to do its thing.  I also found that getting Tasker to recognize I was at work was problematic--was much easier to just set up a "dummy" profile that I can turn on while I am walking in.  This profile then becomes active, and, when latching onto the wireless network, uses Tasker and Locale GV settings to route phone calls to my Google Voice number to Google Chat.  I turn this profile off when leaving work, and the profile that recognizes I am home activates automatically when I get home.  It then uses Tasker to route calls to my Google Voice number both to Google Chat and my home number--I chose this because both my cell and my home phone then ring, and I now the call is one that originally was dialed to my "cell".  I say "cell" because my "cell" number is actually my old Verizon number, which is my Google Voice number.  My Ting number is unknown to anyone--to a large degree, even myself, as I have no need to use it.

    I have found GrooveIP to work really well.  For the most part, I have used my Ting minutes when off the wireless network, but since I was approaching the next tier for minutes as my month ended, but had lots of room for data, I experimented with making calls over 3G/4G, and it worked well, too (after making some adjustments).

    I have used Google Voice exclusively for texting and it has been fine.  I don't need MMS, but I have experimented some lately with Google Hangouts and that might be able to accomplish that, too, if you need it.

    Overall, I am pleased, and plan on moving two other family members over in the next month or so.  My bill for the month will be $22, and I think I can get all three on Ting using this strategy for under $50 without a problem.

     

     

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  • Wonder if you can share a iittle more about use of Tasker with Locale GV (I assume this is needed in addition to Takser) to recognize I am home and want GV to ring Google Talk (Talkatone), Cell (Ting) and home number when I am home, but only Talkatone and Cell (Ting) when I am not. Newbie to this, but this would be great so folks at home won't get bothered by my calls when I am not there:)  Can this be done easily?

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  • Rick, I consider myself a rookie, too, but I'll be glad to share.  I don't know how to export my Tasker configurations, but, honestly, they are not that complicated because I found that the more I tried to do with Tasker, the worse things got.  So, I simplified things and use AutoAP to control turning off cellular when connected to WiFi.  That is not available on newer Andorid OS's, but not a problem for my Galaxy S2.

    You need to download Tasker and Locale GV Settings.  The latter is a plug-in that you access via Tasker.  If you try to click on it directly, it will not do anything.  

    For my "At Home" Profile, I click "New Location" and use "Net" only (turn off GPS).  I did this while at home and picked a small radius (50 m).  For the entry task, I created a task called "GV to Home".  Three things go on here:  

    1. GV Settings (via Locale GV Settings) is set to Goog: On, Ting: off; and Home: on.  As I mentioned above, in theory, I could have Goog:off, too, but I like having it on so when both my home phone and cell phone ring, I know the call originated to my cell phone.
    2. Auto-Sync is turned On.  This allows the phone to Sync while at home
    3. Bluetooth Voice is turned off.  This keeps my car bluetooth from staying connected to my phone.  I use a Bluetooth visor device, not part of my car, so otherwise I would need to power it down.

    I then created an Exit task, "In Car", that does the following:

    1. Auto Sync off.  So my phone does not sync using data
    2. GV Settings:  Goog off; Ting: on; Home: off.  So only my cell rings (via Ting) when out and about
    3. Mobile Data: On.  Not sure if I need to do this, but I do
    4. Bluetooth Voice: On
    5. Bluetooth: On   Not sure of the difference between these two but want to make sure my Bluetooth connects.

    For work, I struggled to get the phone to automatically connect.  Part of the problem is I work at different locations in different parts of the city, some with different SSIDs, etc.  Ultimately, figured I could just manually turn on a profile that would then tell the phone what to do. I am sure there is a more elegant solution, but it is easy enough to click on Tasker and turn this on while walking in, and doing the same while walking out.

    Profile "At Work" has the condition based on time:  From 00:00 to 23:59.  Thus, if I turn the profile on, it will become active.  Then, runs the "Connected At Work" Task, which only uses GV Settings to turn Goog: on, Ting: off; Home: off.  This allows the phone to ring (via Google Chat) when at work on a wireless network.  Note that AutoAP takes care of turning off cellular, etc., just like at home.

    When I leave work, I turn the profile off, and the Exit task is run, which is, once again "In Car".

    I know there is a better way to do this, but it works for me right now, and until I get better at Tasker (might be a while), I will keep using this method.  Any help would be appreciated.  However, as I said before, trying to do more with Tasker before led to connectivity problems.  This has been stable.  Also, note that I am not concerned about battery life while in the car--I am rarely driving more than 15-30 minutes, so WiFi being on is not a big deal.  If I am driving longer, I can always manually turn it off.

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  • Hey David, 

    Thanks so much for such guidance and info. I understand the Locale GV with Tasker (or Locale I guess) partnership.I may pursue to turn on/off GV and/or Ting, and/or Auto Sync and/or access to Mobile wifi device that work pays for when I'm out and about. at home/work/in car. I was thinking after reading a bit that Tasker learning curve may be more than I have time for at the moment, but you brought it down to earth. I wonder if you turn GV off in car because it costs a little data or because quality not as good as when on WiFi...and also wonder if you use Talkatone (what I do, but still don't like the double ring thing, but can deal with) or Groove IP (never tried). And last, a bit off topic, what kind of Blue Tooth visor  devise do you use, I don't like a Bluetooth in my ear but a device in the car would be cool...Thanks again for taking the time to explain your journey. Rick

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  • Rick

    Agree that the learning curve for Tasker for right now is just too great, so I did what works.  And it does work--for me.  I'll figure it out better later, but before I did what I described above, I was about to give up on the phone, and felt the WiFi on it was terrible.  Now, I love it.  One day I'll tackle it, but, coming from 20 years of the Mac world, I've come pretty far for just a month.

    I use GrooveIP.  Had to decide between it and TalkaTone, and was split pretty evenly.  Had to choose one.  I've been happy.  Can't comment on TalkaTone.

    In the car, I typically use "Ting" minutes, which are pretty cheap in general (I was under 100 minutes last month, or $3), which is why I route the calls to Ting in the car and not to GV.  At the end of my first month, I did find myself getting close to the next "level" in minutes but with plenty of headroom for data, so I routed calls to GV then--data was going to be free because I wasn't going to hit the next level, but minutes might have crossed over if I wasn't careful.  I believe data would be about 1.2mb/minute of talk, so it is possible I would find it may be more economical to use data in time.  However, at this time, my reading has generally been that Ting minutes are cheaper than data.  That, of course, assumes I fully use all I have paid for.  If I have 300mb of data free at the end of a month, that equates to about 4 hours of talk time.  It is more a game--I can easily afford the $6 or so, but bragging about the low bill is so cool and I might as well get the most I can for my money.  I did need to make some adjustments to make it so there was not an echo on the other end, but I got it working ok and the quality was not bad.

    I use the BlueAnt S4 Bluetooth visor.  It predates my Ting phone.  I formerly used a Jabra Cruiser, which had good quality at my end, but the recipient (read: my wife) said the sound was not so good at her end.  The S4 has been fabulous in that regard.  

    Let me know how it works out for you and if you ever learn more about Tasker.  I will get there--Pocketables has some great tutorials--but I fear this will require some study on my part to get up there.  

    This whole Ting thing is pretty cool--but to become a "power user" takes a little effort and willingness to compromise on some items.  Well worth it, in my opinion.

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  • David,

    Thanks again for more good info...Also a 20 yr. Mac person mostly, and know about Talkatone so chose that cause I use on iPad. Don't think

    Have a Transform Ultra (first smartphone) cause I got it for a deal, had keyboard, wifi and tethering (that I haven't messed with yet). Still not sure about Taskar but interesting for sure. Mostly may use if/when I start using an Obi100 with Google Voice at home and dump my landline (kind of a bragging rights thing too, but will save some for the kids's college funds:) Just that you can't fully use Obi with same GV number if using Talkatone since both use Google Talk relay, may use a different number and very cheap CallCentric (for landline # to be ported, since GV doesn't cover my exchange and for e911...glad to share more what I have learned about: this set up). Tasker may make more sense for me if/when I convert to Obi, then I may want to swap profile or number access to different GV and CallCentric numbers when home or other configs.

    Since you use Ting vs GV for savings (or brag rights) and not quality issue, I wonder how you experience GV on data vs on wifi vs Ting in terms of quality. I haven't fully assessed, but think call quality is not as good on GV vs Ting and less good on data vs WiFi...and not sure if MiFi device (via Sprint that work pays for) is more like data re speed and quality or true WiFi, I think more like data. So GV is always free for me if I use WiFi or MiFi or data, just not sure on quality for each.

    Thanks for info on Bluetooth Visor, that could be handy for me...and kids remind me to avoid the radiation thing:)

    Appreciate your info again.

    Rick

     

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  • I need more help! I finally realized a problem that I created, but not sure how to fix it. I wanted to keep a long-term phone number, so before coming to Ting, I ported my old number to GV, and that was going to be the only number I handed out to people. I set GV to forward all calls to my new Ting device number. But I also heard about saving minutes by using GV over home wi-fi, so I got GrooveIP, and when I got home I would turn on the "airplane mode" to force the phone to only use wi-fi. But in this thread, there is an instruction to set your Ting device to forward unanswered calls to the GV number. I would be sitting in my chair at home, and get a notification that I had a new voice-mail, but the phone had never rung. Apparently, I created an endless loop, where GV would forward to Ting, which would forward to GV, etc., until it would eventually go to voice-mail. (For those patient enough to wait thru all the looping!) 

    My guess is that I should NOT forward from the Ting device to GV, but let people call the GV number and get my Ting device. (Then I could still use GrooveIP at home to call out, just not to receive calls.) But in that case, I should probably stop using GV for voicemail, and use the Ting voice-mail, so that everything gets pushed to Ting. Does this make sense?

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